Alzheimer's​ ​Association Walk


Posted by: Jennifer​ ​Ridgeway,​ ​LPN​ ​Director​ ​of​ &# on Friday, October 6, 2017 at 12:00:00 am Comments (0)

In​ ​light​ ​of​ ​the​ ​upcoming​ ​walk​ ​for​ ​Alzheimer's​ ​Association​ ​on​ ​October​ ​8th​ ​in Atlantic​ ​City,​ ​I​ ​thought​ ​I​ ​would​ ​share​ ​some​ ​information​ ​that​ ​you​ ​may​ ​or​ ​may​ ​not​ ​already know.​ ​The​ ​walk​ ​is​ ​to​ ​raise​ ​awareness​ ​for​ ​Alzheimer's​ ​disease​ ​and​ ​to​ ​raise​ ​money​ ​to further​ ​fund​ ​research​ ​to​ ​try​ ​to​ ​find​ ​a​ ​cure,​ ​come​ ​up​ ​with​ ​other​ ​medications​ ​to​ ​help​ ​slow the​ ​disease​ ​process​ ​and​ ​to​ ​help​ ​caregivers​ ​and​ ​family​ ​with​ ​resources​ ​needed.​ ​If​ ​you​ ​have attended​ ​a​ ​walk​ ​the​ ​flowers​ ​that​ ​are​ ​handed​ ​out​ ​by​ ​the​ ​association​ ​are​ ​different​ ​colors, each​ ​color​ ​represents​ ​why​ ​you​ ​are​ ​participating​ ​in​ ​the​ ​walk.​ ​Yellow​ ​is​ ​the​ ​color​ ​for caregivers,​ ​blue​ ​for​ ​those​ ​who​ ​have​ ​the​ ​disease,​ ​and​ ​orange​ ​for​ ​those​ ​who​ ​are supporters.​ ​This​ ​year,​ ​a​ ​new​ ​flower​ ​was​ ​introduced.​ ​The​ ​white​ ​flower​ ​is​ ​for​ ​the​ ​first survivor.​ ​That​ ​person​ ​does​ ​not​ ​exist​ ​at​ ​this​ ​time.

Alzheimer's​ ​disease​ ​is​ ​a​ ​progressive​ ​brain​ ​disorder​ ​that​ ​damages​ ​and​ ​destroys brain​ ​cells.​ ​As​ ​Alzheimer's​ ​advances​ ​through​ ​the​ ​brain​ ​it​ ​leads​ ​to​ ​increasingly​ ​severe symptoms,​ ​including​ ​disorientation;​ ​mood​ ​and​ ​behavior​ ​changes;​ ​deepening​ ​confusion about​ ​events,​ ​time​ ​and​ ​place;​ ​unfounded​ ​suspicions​ ​about​ ​family,​ ​friends​ ​and professional​ ​caregivers;​ ​serious​ ​memory​ ​loss​ ​and​ ​behavior​ ​changes;​ ​and​ ​difficulty speaking,​ ​swallowing​ ​and​ ​walking.​ ​Ultimately,​ ​Alzheimer's​ ​is​ ​fatal,​ ​and​ ​at​ ​this​ ​time, there​ ​is​ ​no​ ​cure. Early​ ​recognition​ ​is​ ​key​ ​in​ ​helping​ ​slow​ ​the​ ​disease​ ​process.​ ​Symptoms​ ​of​ ​early Alzheimer's​ ​include;​ ​difficulty​ ​performing​ ​tasks​ ​that​ ​take​ ​some​ ​thought​ ​(such​ ​as balancing​ ​a​ ​checkbook,​ ​playing​ ​complex​ ​games,​ ​and​ ​learning​ ​new​ ​information​ ​or routines),​ ​getting​ ​lost​ ​on​ ​familiar​ ​routes,​ ​trouble​ ​remembering​ ​the​ ​names​ ​of​ ​familiar objects,​ ​losing​ ​interest​ ​in​ ​things​ ​previously​ ​enjoyed,​ ​misplacing​ ​items​ ​and​ ​personality changes​ ​and/or​ ​loss​ ​of​ ​social​ ​skills.​ ​Symptoms​ ​of​ ​mid​ ​stage​ ​Alzheimer’s​ ​include;​ ​change in​ ​sleep​ ​patterns,​ ​delusions,​ ​depression,​ ​agitation,​ ​difficulty​ ​preparing​ ​meals,​ ​choosing proper​ ​clothing,​ ​and​ ​driving.​ ​Difficulty​ ​reading/writing.​ ​Forgetting​ ​events​ ​in​ ​one's​ ​life history​ ​and​ ​losing​ ​self-awareness.​ ​​Hallucinations​,​ ​arguments,​ ​striking​ ​out,​ ​and​ ​violent behavior.​ ​Poor​ ​judgment​ ​and​ ​loss​ ​of​ ​ability​ ​to​ ​recognize​ ​danger.​ ​Using​ ​the​ ​wrong​ ​word, mispronouncing​ ​words,​ ​or​ ​speaking​ ​in​ ​confusing​ ​sentences.​ ​Symptoms​ ​for​ ​people​ ​with severe​ ​AD​ ​include;​ ​unable​ ​to​ ​recognize​ ​family​ ​members,​ ​unable​ ​to​ ​perform​ ​basic activities​ ​of​ ​daily​ ​living,​ ​such​ ​as​ ​eating,​ ​dressing,​ ​and​ ​bathing​ ​and​ ​no​ ​longer​ ​able​ ​to understand​ ​language. There​ ​is​ ​no​ ​proven​ ​way​ ​to​ ​prevent​ ​Alzheimer's​ ​but​ ​there​ ​are​ ​some​ ​measures​ ​that may​ ​help​ ​prevent/slow​ ​the​ ​onset.​ ​Eat​ ​a​ ​​ ​low-fat​ ​diet​ ​and​ ​consume​ ​foods​ ​high​ ​in​ ​omega-3 fatty​ ​acids.​ ​Stay​ ​active,​ ​get​ ​plenty​ ​of​ ​exercise.​ ​Continue​ ​being​ ​mentally​ ​and​ ​socially active.​ ​Lastly,​ ​protect​ ​your​ ​head​ ​during​ ​risky​ ​activities​ ​to​ ​prevent​ ​brain​ ​injury.  All​ ​of​ ​the​ ​information​ ​that​ ​I​ ​have​ ​provided​ ​you​ ​thus​ ​far​ ​is​ ​from​ ​different​ ​websites about​ ​Alzheimer's​ ​disease.​ ​Now​ ​I​ ​will​ ​provide​ ​you​ ​information​ ​based​ ​on​ ​my​ ​experience with​ ​working​ ​with​ ​

Dementia/Alzheimer's​ ​residents.​ ​First,​ ​they​ ​are​ ​still​ ​your​ ​parent, sibling,​ ​child,​ ​grandparent,etc..never​ ​forget​ ​where​ ​you​ ​came​ ​from.​ ​They​ ​were​ ​there​ ​for you​ ​growing​ ​up,​ ​please​ ​do​ ​not​ ​avoid​ ​them​ ​once​ ​they​ ​progress​ ​through​ ​the​ ​disease.​ ​No, they​ ​may​ ​not​ ​know​ ​who​ ​you​ ​are,​ ​but​ ​you​ ​know​ ​who​ ​they​ ​are.​ ​Secondly,​ ​it​ ​is​ ​ok​ ​to​ ​get upset​ ​even​ ​mad​ ​at​ ​the​ ​things​ ​are​ ​loved​ ​ones​ ​do,​ ​they​ ​do​ ​not​ ​understand​ ​what​ ​they​ ​are doing​ ​and​ ​should​ ​not​ ​be​ ​shamed​ ​for​ ​doing​ ​such​ ​things.​ ​Next,​ ​do​ ​not​ ​be​ ​in​ ​denial​ ​with your​ ​loved​ ​ones.​ ​Lastly,​ ​it​ ​is​ ​ok​ ​to​ ​ask​ ​for​ ​help.​ ​

Caring​ ​for​ ​someone​ ​with​ ​dementia​ ​is emotionally​ ​and​ ​physically​ ​draining.​ ​Do​ ​not​ ​blame​ ​yourself​ ​for​ ​“putting​ ​them​ ​in​ ​a home”,​ ​eventually​ ​they​ ​will​ ​consider​ ​it​ ​their​ ​“home”.​ ​I​ ​can​ ​go​ ​on​ ​and​ ​on​ ​about​ ​my opinions,​ ​but​ ​I​ ​won’t.​ ​If​ ​you​ ​have​ ​a​ ​loved​ ​one​ ​that​ ​is​ ​experiencing​ ​some​ ​early​ ​onset symptoms,​ ​please​ ​seek​ ​medical​ ​advice. Hope​ ​you​ ​enjoyed​ ​the​ ​information​ ​provided.​ ​Please​ ​feel​ ​free​ ​to​ ​contact​ ​me​ ​at anytime​ ​if​ ​you​ ​have​ ​a​ ​question​ ​and​ ​I​ ​will​ ​try​ ​to​ ​get​ ​you​ ​the​ ​help​ ​you​ ​need.

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